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OPTP Slant™

Sku: 412

Ideal for stretching, strengthening and rehabilitation at home or in the clinic, these foam incline boards are easier-to-use and more affordable than wooden, metal or plastic alternatives.

OPTP SlantTM boards are integral in the prevention and treatment of common lower-leg and foot problems such as Achilles tendonitis, heel spurs, shin splints, calf strains, plantar fasciitis, overuse syndromes and post-surgery contraction. They’re perfectly suited for stretching and weight-bearing exercise at home or in a clinic. Can also be used to improve the sitting posture of children.

These lightweight, but sturdy, slant boards are constructed of special weight-bearing foam, making them easier-to-handle and more cost-effective compared to wooden, metal or plastic boards. 18° incline. Latex-free. Sold in pairs.

Measure 11¾" L x 11¾" W x 3¾" H with an 18° incline.

UPC: 793573900210

Overall Rating
May 3, 2015 / Cecilia, Fully Certified Pilates Instructor - Carrollton, TX

Helps low-back stiffness, to gain core strength

Adding to my previous review, I've discovered an additional very valuable benefit of this item. I use it with clients who have no flexibility in their lumbar (low back) vertebrae, OR too much lordosis (concavity). Lying supine, on their back, I place it under their tailbone/sacrum area (the thickest end under that part of their spine) to help them form flexion (a posterior pelvic tilt) as they practice, with pelvic rocking exercises, how to pull in their abdominal muscles toward their spine. Next, while they do their abdominal challenging exercises (reaching their legs away) this prop perfectly enables the client to maintain stability in that lumbar region to protect it, allowing the client to keep their abdominal muscles pulled in tight with good control.
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Adding to my previous review, I've discovered an additional very valuable benefit of this item. I use it with clients who have no flexibility in their lumbar (low back) vertebrae, OR too much lordosis (concavity). Lying supine, on their back, I place it under their tailbone/sacrum area (the thickest end under that part of their spine) to help them form flexion (a posterior pelvic tilt) as they practice, with pelvic rocking exercises, how to pull in their abdominal muscles toward their spine. Next, while they do their abdominal challenging exercises (reaching their legs away) this prop perfectly enables the client to maintain stability in that lumbar region to protect it, allowing the client to keep their abdominal muscles pulled in tight with good control.

Overall Rating
July 21, 2014 / Cecilia, Fully Certified Pilates Instructor

For Neutral Pelvis While in Supine

Coincidentally I use this slant for the same reasons as the first reviewer: while the client is lying supine, I place the slant under their lumbar spine giving them the cue to make a neutral pelvis (tailbone down, respecting the small of the back). It gives client wonderful awareness of stability of neutral pelvis while Pilates exercises that challenge core strength are performed.
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Coincidentally I use this slant for the same reasons as the first reviewer: while the client is lying supine, I place the slant under their lumbar spine giving them the cue to make a neutral pelvis (tailbone down, respecting the small of the back). It gives client wonderful awareness of stability of neutral pelvis while Pilates exercises that challenge core strength are performed.

Overall Rating
December 16, 2013 / j. kao, Fitness Trainer (biomechanics, postural alignment) - New York, NY

Pelvis Position Corrector!

I use this with clients who have habitual "slouch" (posterior pelvic tilt) to re-train proper bio-mechanical pelvic (& spinal) alignment. Usually i wrap some rubberized "shelf liner" around the slant, so the client's butt doesn't slide off the seat! :) Also works well in some leg machines (e.g. hamstring curl, leg extension, etc) where seat-pan tends to tilt backwards (meaning hips lower than knees - often causing post. pelvic tilt, rather than neutral pelvis, and greater strain on low back during exercise).
View More...
I use this with clients who have habitual "slouch" (posterior pelvic tilt) to re-train proper bio-mechanical pelvic (& spinal) alignment. Usually i wrap some rubberized "shelf liner" around the slant, so the client's butt doesn't slide off the seat! :) Also works well in some leg machines (e.g. hamstring curl, leg extension, etc) where seat-pan tends to tilt backwards (meaning hips lower than knees - often causing post. pelvic tilt, rather than neutral pelvis, and greater strain on low back during exercise).

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