Home » Blog

Blog


Sort By Author:

Rapid Identification Guide for Sacroiliac Joint Dysfunction

Identifying the cause of pain is vital in providing proper patient treatment. This guide from physical therapist Valerie Phelps, PT, ScD, of the International Academy of Orthopedic Medicine, can be used to help identify one of the most common musculoskeletal problems in the lower back and buttock region – sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

Patient background information

Always begin with an established system to gain information including patient history. This allows you to:

  • Easily recognize common pathologies
  • Identify new patterns of pain or clinical findings that can lead to detection of other specific disorders
  • Educate and reassure your client on the possible problem
  • Assist in selecting further consulting professionals

Patient history

The patient history should be an established system of seeking information and would include:

  • Age of the patient
  • A pain drawing used to help identify the pain
  • Identifying what provokes or improves symptoms

Clinical testing

The clinical testing would include a mechanical provocation test that helps answer the following questions:

  • Is it painful?
  • What provokes/improves symptoms?
  • Where is it painful?
  • Is this pain familiar (pain that has been bothering you for a period of time) vs. discomfort caused by the clinical test itself?

Battery of tests to determine areas of pain

  • Trunk motions
    • Forward flexion
    • Forward flexion with the addition of a chin-tuck
    • Extension
    • Side-bending to each side
  • Straight-leg raise performed supine on a table
  • Slump test (a dural test performed while sitting)
  • Sacroiliac joint provocation
    • Dorsolateral provocation
    • Ventromedial provocation
    • Asymmetrical in side lying

Pathologies for sacroiliac joint dysfunction

  • Arthropathy
    • Synovitis
    • Hyper/hypomobility
  • Pubic Symphysis
  • Pelvic Ring Dysfunction

Common contributors to sacroiliac joint pathology

  • Age (generally 18-35 years)
  • Pregnancy
  • Participation in sports that require strong unilateral movements, such as soccer

Common identifiers of sacroiliac joint pathology

  • Painful with asymmetrical movements, like standing on one leg, or taking stairs two at a time
  • Generally, shows localized region of pain at about the area of the PSIS
  • About 40% of the time the patient will show some referral pain pattern to the greater trochanter
  • If complaining of pain in lumbar region or down the leg, it’s rarely associated with SI joint pathology

Clinical test results that help identify sacroiliac joint dysfunction

  • Trunk and hip motions will potentially be painful at the end range where the joint gets a torque or tension to it
    • End range flexion
    • End range extension
  • Straight-leg raise test and slump testing will be negative
  • Painful provocation tests
    • Pain reduced/relieved when a stabilizing belt is applied, and the test is repeated

Additional tests when the patient also complains of midline or groin pain

  • Resisted adduction in 45°
    • This test is classically painful with a pubic symphysis problem
    • Pain resolves when repeated adduction is performed with a pelvic ring stabilizing belt

Sacroiliac joint and pubic symphysis often create pelvic ring dysfunction

  • May or may not be associated with pain
  • Patient may complain of vague discomfort in the “panty area”
  • A straight leg raise test can be done to test strength of each side

Ways to manage sacroiliac joint dysfunction

  • Education
  • Manipulation to restore the position of the SI joint, as needed
  • Injections
    • SI joint
    • Pubic symphysis
  • Stabilization training
    • Diaphram
    • Abdominals
    • Gluteals
    • Latissimus Dorsi
  • SI-LOC Support Belt application
    • Often 24/7 for up to 2 years to allow for connective tissue to turn over, resulting in “tighter” ligamentous support
    • Can be worn less often, (during the pain producing activity, for instance) in less severe cases

The SI-LOC Support Belt is effective for treating SI joint dysfunction. Its lightweight, breathable fabric can be worn against the skin and conceals easily under clothes.

Learn more about the SI-LOC Support Belt

For more information about SI joint dysfunction and other physical therapy topics, visit IAOM-us.com

Valerie Phelps, PT, ScD, is a physical therapist and the founder and director of Advanced Physical Therapy. She is also the founder of the U.S. branch of the International Academy of Orthopedic Medicine (IAOM) where she serves as education director.

READ MORE Amy Bowman, OPTP Staff Writer - April 9, 2019


How to Choose a Foam Roller: 3 Features to Consider

So you’re going to get a foam roller? Seems like an easy enough decision to make. I mean, it’s a simple piece of foam, it can’t be that hard to figure out. But then you start looking at all the options out there, seeing the many different varieties. Pretty soon, it can become overwhelming.

Trying to decide which foam roller is best for you isn’t as easy as you might think, but it’s important. Choosing the right roller will help ensure effectiveness, usability and compliance. After all, if it doesn’t feel right you won’t be motivated to use it…and a roller that goes unused doesn’t provide much benefit!

In this article, we’ll look at three keys to consider when picking a roller, helping you break down the options. As follows, we’ve identified what we feel are the three most important factors; density, size/shape and construction.

  1. Density
Arguably the most important choice to make regarding your new foam roller is the density. You might also hear this referred to as the compression, firmness, cushion or “give,” which all mean the same thing. Generally, rollers can be broken down into three density categories; soft, medium or firm.


Soft
Soft density rollers have more “give” or cushion to them. They’re designed for those who are looking for more comfort as opposed to the deeper massage of firm and standard rollers. The soft density produces a massage that is gentler on the muscles, making it ideal for users with sensitive muscles or those who simply prefer a less intensive massage.
Standard
These rollers have a medium firmness. Their universal quality makes them ideal for both self-massage and exercise. They provide just enough firmness for deep massage while still having moderate cushion. Their medium density also serves nicely as stable props for use in core strengthening exercises such as those performed in Pilates and yoga.

Firm
For those seeking a deeper, more intense massage, firm density foam rollers are the answer. Athletes and highly active individuals often have tight muscles that can benefit from the penetrating nature of these rollers. Firm rollers are great at breaking up even the most constricted fascia (the interconnected web surrounding the muscles), a process known as myofascial release.  

  1. Size and Shape
There are also many different sizes of foam rollers on the market. While the majority are the traditional full-size round cylinders, many other sizes and even different shapes exist. Let’s take a look at some of the more common sizes to see how each lends itself to certain uses.

Standard Full-size
When most people think of a foam roller, this is usually what comes to mind. The typical full-size roller measures approximately 36” length x 6” diameter. This size is versatile for a variety of uses, including massage (ideally larger muscles groups like hamstrings, quads and the back), physical therapy and general exercise. Due to their three-foot length, these rollers are perfect for any type of exercise where you lie on the roller with it positioned vertically along the spine, such as Pilates or related core strength and balance movements.
Shorter Length
If you’re looking for a more portable roller, perhaps one that is travel size and you can take with you to the gym, physical therapy clinic or Pilates studio, consider a shorter length. Most shorter rollers have the same diameter as a traditional full-size (6” or thereabouts) but feature a shorter length; typically either 18” or 12”. In addition to the benefit of portability, they also make it easier to target certain muscle groups. The shorter rollers are ideal for targeting more precise areas such as calves, IT Bands or glutes.

Smaller Diameter
A smaller diameter roller — typically 4” — means that it will be lower to the floor and more stable. This is often important for physical therapy patients, aging users or those with a compromised sense of balance. Being lower to the floor means that it provides a safer, more stable feeling. It’s also easier to control while using for massage.
Ridges or Bumps
Need a little something extra? Some uniquely designed foam rollers offer protrusions for those that like a more invigorating massage or simply want the ability to target precise areas. Rollers with ridges, bumps or points can provide a deeper penetrating massage that breaks up fascia in even the most tight, compact areas.
Flat Half-size
There are a variety of foam rollers that lend themselves nicely to balance and core strength exercise. Although they come in a range of shapes, a typical size is a 36” length x 3” height that is cut in half the long way, making it rounded on one side and flat on the other. This shape is useful for physical therapy, Pilates, yoga, Feldenkrais® and general core strength exercise.

  1. Construction
Not all foam is created equal. Believe it or not, there is a fair amount of engineering that goes into the development of a foam roller. The way it is constructed helps determine its longevity — and primary location of use — important considerations to make before purchase.

Open-Cell
Rollers built with an open-cell construction, while suitable for massage and exercise, tend to break down much faster than closed-cell rollers. You’ll typically find open-cell rollers at your local big-box store and, while inexpensive, there are higher-quality closed-cell options available at affordable prices. Closed-cell foam rollers offer the durability you expect from a foam roller and are available in two types of foam; EPP and EVA.

EPP Foam
Rollers made from EPP foam beads are high quality but still relatively inexpensive. They’re versatile and suited for users of all levels. Because they offer a nice combination of durability and affordability, they make a great starting point for the average person while still being effective for the more advanced user. EPP rollers are designed to last much longer than open-cell rollers, though they do not offer the supreme durability of EVA foam.

EVA Foam
Rollers made from EVA foam deliver unmatched durability. These “professional strength” foam rollers are built to withstand the type of heavy, repeated use often found in gyms, clinics or Pilates studios where many people are using them throughout the day. The at-home user can also benefit from the longevity of these rollers, having confidence in knowing they will hold up for a longer time than any of the other foam types.

As you can see, there’s a bit of thought required before making your foam roller purchase. But put the time in up front and you’ll be rewarded with a roller that suits your comfort level and intended usage, motivating you to use it with consistency. Start with the big three features — density, size/shape and construction — and you’re well on your way to making the perfect selection.


Ready to browse all the options? View OPTP’s extensive selection of foam rollers, including the densities, sizes and foam types mentioned in this article.

READ MORE Josh Crane, OPTP Staff Writer - June 12, 2018


Thrust Joint Manipulation Skills for the Spine: A New Manual Therapy Textbook Delivering Clinical Pearls

Over the course of their combined 80 years of practicing and teaching manipulative therapy, Emilio Puentedura, PT, DPT, PhD, OCS, GDMT, CSMT, FAAOMPT, and William O’Grady, PT, DPT, OCS, COMT, DAAPM, FAAOMPT have developed a deep understanding of the why, when and how behind administering thrust joint manipulation.
 
Like anyone who devotes themselves wholeheartedly to a craft, they have acquired specific knowledge of the practice and honed their skills with laser precision. But for these two, simply becoming experts in their field was not enough. Their passion for helping others led to a desire to share their expertise, and so they authored a new manual therapy textbook published exclusively by OPTP.
 
Thrust Joint Manipulation Skills for the Spine, which includes access to videos demonstrating 45 manipulation techniques, is designed for both clinicians and students. The book demonstrates when and how to perform thrust joint manipulation techniques for patients with musculoskeletal dysfunction in the spine, providing numerous “clinical pearls” along the way.  
 
The book has already been well received and continues to garner recognition from the manual therapy world. We recently sat down with the authors to get their take on the unique value of its content, and here’s what they had to say.
 
 

Discover how these clinical pearls can enhance your practice and understanding of spine manipulation. Learn more about Thrust Joint Manipulation Skills for the Spine.

READ MORE Josh Crane, OPTP Staff Writer - May 10, 2018


From the Authors | William O’Grady: Thrust Joint Manipulation Skills for the Spine

In the first installment of our “From the Authors” series, Bill O’Grady tells us about his inspiration and intentions for writing Thrust Joint Manipulation Skills for the Spine, an exclusive new manual therapy textbook he co-authored with Emilio (Louie) Puentedura.

Louie and I had been teaching together for 10 years when we set out to write this book. Between the two of us, we brought almost 90 years of clinical experience and teaching to the table.

We both gravitated toward this field because we found that skillful application of these techniques provided such obvious successful outcomes. Its natural appeal was that we could witness immediate improvement in both the symptoms and quality of life for our patients.

We were fortunate to have great mentors and influences like Freddy Kaltenborn, Olaf Evjenth, James Cyriax, Stanley Paris, Geoff Maitland, Robin McKenzie, Dick Erhard, Peter Gibbons, Phil Tehan, David Lamb, Cliff Fowler, Erl Pettman and Laurie Hartman. Many of these renowned gentlemen authored their own textbooks on mobilization and thrust manipulation, and several of them were groundbreaking for our field. Needless to say, there are many books that provide descriptions of thrust techniques.

When Louie and I decided to write this book, we wanted to incorporate our education, clinical experience and teaching. Our goal was to publish a book that is simple to read and geared not only toward the entry-level and residency/fellowship student, but also the educator.  

The book includes a history of thrust joint manipulation (TJM) as well as research on the effectiveness, safety and clinical reasoning of using TJM. But we feel what makes our book most unique is the content in chapters five and seven.

Chapter five provides drills that both the student and educator can use to hone their thrust manipulation skills. There are drills in perfecting patient handling/palpation, stance, appreciating end feel as well as use of the core and larger muscle groups for control and speed development.

Chapter seven provides the “meat and potatoes” of the book. Each technique is briefly described, followed by the key recommendations of when to use it, which tests to perform after “red” and “yellow” flags are ruled out and the primary muscle groups that need to be activated to cue the operator and successfully perform the thrust. It is our belief that the larger muscle groups are responsible for speed and control while the hands are simply extensions of these muscles.  

Each technique is divided into five bulleted parts; “patient position,” “therapist position,” “points of contact,” “position for the thrust” and “application of the thrust.” Below each technique the reader will find tips for fine tuning and keys to success. These “clinical pearls” are provided to help the clinician/student perfect their TJM skills. The techniques and fine-tuning pearls are described in significant detail, providing the building blocks for effective and safe TJM to the spine.

Finally, the online videos provide both a “real time” thrust manipulation and a second step-by-step instruction of each technique. Easy online access allows the clinician to view techniques on their mobile phone or tablet from anywhere, at any time.


William H. O’Grady, PT, DPT, OCS, FAPTA, FAAOMPT, DAAPM
Dr. O’ Grady is a nationally recognized expert in the management of spinal disorders and has taught manipulative techniques for over 40 years. He has served as chair of the Board of Examiners for the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists (AAOMPT), and as an instructor in advanced manipulation technique for the University of Southern California spine fellowship program as well as an adjunct professor at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.


Discover how the clinical pearls from Bill and Louie’s book can enhance your practice and understanding of spine manipulation. Learn more about Thrust Joint Manipulation Skills for the Spine.

READ MORE William H. O’Grady, PT, DPT - March 21, 2018


Science Meets Design: The Rollga® Foam Roller

As a company that sells foam rollers as one of its primary products, we get asked the question quite often: “What’s the science behind a foam roller?” Or, as some put it, “Really…how can there be technology in a piece of foam?”

The Rollga® Dynasty, OPTP’s newest addition to its extensive lineup of foam rollers, offers answers to some of these questions. Shaped to fit the body, the Rollga has a unique contour design that allows for targeted, invigorating massage for tension relief and muscle recovery.

Rollga
As Rollga co-founder Tim Schmidt has noted, Rollga is also the only foam roller to pioneer cross-directional forces; its rounded edges produce multiple angles that stretch and separate the fascia, resulting in fascial shearing.

The roller’s rounded edges also offer protection for the ankle, thoracic spine, and hip while rolling. The less direct application of force means that we can spend more time rolling out fascia and less time hitting bones.

While it might not be the stuff of NASA engineering, it certainly shows how therapy and fitness products such as foam rollers are incorporating scientific smarts into their design.

Watch as Tim explains in more detail how the anatomy of the Rollga affects the anatomy of the body.

READ MORE Josh Crane, OPTP Staff Writer - September 27, 2017


The 3 Most Common Running Injuries & How to Treat Them

Whether you run to reduce stress, beat the clock, or attain a leaner figure, it’s a lifestyle that’s hard to give up…even in the face of injury.

Over one-third of runners sustain at least one soft tissue injury over the course of a year.1,2 The following three types of injuries are some of the most common, and ones that you’ll likely experience at some point if you haven’t already. But don’t fear, we’ve identified therapy products for each condition to help expedite the recovery process.

Iliotibial Band Syndrome (ITBS)
ITBS is an overuse injury that presents itself in up to 12 percent of runners each year, and it is the most common cause of lateral knee pain in running athletes.4 Significant risk factors include downhill running and an abrupt increase in running distance, pace, or frequency.

One of the best ways to tackle Iliotibial Band Syndrome is through myofascial release with a foam roller. Foam roller therapy is an essential aide for several running injuries, including ITBS.3 If you’re new to foam rolling, it can be a bit overwhelming as foam rollers come in all shapes, sizes, and densities. This page provides a brief introduction to foam rollers to help you get started.

Once you’ve found your roller, take advantage of the many educational resources out there that will help you use it. Foam Roller Techniques by Michael Fredericson, MD features color illustrations and clear, step-by-step instructions to effectively massage and stretch a runner’s most important muscle groups, including the IT Band. Check out the video below and see how to massage the IT Band and other sensitive areas with your roller.



Shin Splints & Ankle Sprains
About 10-20 percent of all runners experience a bout of medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS), or shin splints, at some point during their career.8 For inflammatory conditions like shin splints or ankle sprains, ice, rest, and orthotic shoe inserts are commonly prescribed.

Kinesiology taping, however, offers additional options for pain modulation and return to function. Unlike conventional tapes, SpiderTech® kinesiology tape has the same weight, thickness, and elasticity as human skin, allowing it to work naturally with the body’s own sensory system to reduce pain and provide natural stability. It’s available in more than a dozen pre-cut applications, including designs for the ankle as well as a foot arch and calf combo.  

Another way to address shin splints, ankle sprains, and calf strains is with the OPTP SlantTM. This pair of lightweight foam wedges allows for simple stretching exercises. Their 18-degree incline is ideal for stretching the hamstrings and calves to help with tight fascia and strengthening of the tissues in this region.

Plantar Fasciitis
Plantar fasciitis is the third most frequent injury among runners.5 It is characterized by inflammation in the long tendon at the bottom of the foot, which stretches from the heel to the toes. Although the etiology of this condition is controversial, several risk factors, including high body weight and reduced ankle dorsiflexion, have been associated with increased incidence rates.6 Research suggests that conducting tissue-specific plantar fascia stretching several times a day helps alleviate and prevent pain due to chronic plantar fasciitis.7

With a cradle design that encompasses the foot, the Stretch-EZ™ is a unique stretching aide that assists with plantar fasciitis, as well as calf, thigh, hip and low back strains and injuries. By inserting the foot into the cradle and pulling back, it produces superior dorsiflexion of the toes that stretches the plantar fascia. Since the Stretch-EZ features multiple strap loops, it allows you to safely and easily control each stretch.Half Balls

A lot of runners are told to use a tennis ball or lacrosse ball for their plantar fasciitis. While this can be a viable option, there are plenty of products out there designed specifically for massage of the foot. These Half Balls are the ideal texture and firmness for that purpose. The flat bottom ensures they won’t roll away during use, making it easier to target specific areas for a better massage and stretch of the plantar fascia.

Back Up and Running
Perhaps you’ll be one of the fortunate ones who’s able to steer clear of these running injuries. But if not, you now have some basic knowledge to guide you on the path to recovery. Hopefully, with consistent use of the right therapy tools and a mental approach grounded in patience, you’ll be back out on the pavement and trails before you know it.

* For your safety, always consult with your healthcare professional before starting any type of exercise or stretching program, especially if you have any health concerns. Products mentioned in this article are intended to provide therapeutic relief but do not guarantee cure of condition.


References
1 Buist I, Bredeweg SW, Lemmink K, et al. Predictors of running-related injuries in novice runners enrolled in a systematic training program: a prospective cohort study.
Am J Sports Med. 2010; 38(2):273-280.
2 Rauh MJ, Koepsell TD, Rivara FP, et al. Epidemiology of musculoskeletal injuries among high school cross-country runners. Am J Epidemiol. 2006; 163(2):151–159.
3 Fredericson M, Weir A. Practical management of iliotibial band friction syndrome in runners. Clin J Sport Med. 2006; 16(3):261-268.
4 Fredericson M, Wolf C. Iliotibial band syndrome in runners. Sports Med. 2005; 35(5):451-459.
5 Ribeiro AP, Trombini-Souza FT, Tessutti VD, et al. The effects of plantar fasciitis and pain on plantar pressure distribution of recreational runners. Clinical Biomechanics.
2011; 26:194-199.
6 Riddle DL, Pulisic M, Pidcoe P, et al. Risk factors for plantar fasciitis: a matched case-control study. Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. 2003; 85A (5):872-877.
7 DiGiovanni BF, Nawoczenski DA, Malay DP, et al. Plantar fascia–specific stretching improves outcomes in patients with chronic plantar fasciitis: a prospective clinical trial with two-year follow-up. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2008; 88:1775–81.
8 Hubbard TJ, Carpenter EM, & Cordova ML. Contributing factors to medial tibial stress syndrome: a prospective investigation. Med Sci Sports Exercise. 2009; 41(3): 490-496.

READ MORE Josh Crane, OPTP Staff Writer - July 31, 2017


Fight Back: 3 (Inexpensive) Ways to Lessen Back Pain

Low back pain. Millions of Americans have had it or will have it at some point. It’s estimated that it affects nearly 80% of us at one point in our lives (Adriaan Louw, Everyone Has Back Pain, 2015). And then there’s the expense. Billions of dollars go toward medications and surgeries to combat the common condition, though these costly solutions may be temporary or ineffective.

So how do back pain sufferers, or those who might be forced to deal with the formidable beast somewhere down the road, rise to the challenge? Here are three simple and affordable (compared to the alternatives) actions we can take to help prevent or alleviate pain.

1.    Increase Movement
Sitting has actually been called the new smoking. While this may be a bit of a stretch, it goes to show that many experts agree on the dangers of prolonged sitting. The fact is, we’ve become a sitting society (sit in the car on the way to work, sit at work for eight hours, sit in the car on the way home, sit on the couch), and our spines — not designed for this — are feeling the effects.

Due to this stagnant behavior, we tend to suffer from a lack of blood flow and oxygen to the discs of the spine. As physical therapist and research specialist Adriaan Louw says, “Motion is lotion.” When we don’t move enough, we don’t hydrate the discs, leading to more stiffness and less flexibility (think Tin Man from Wizard of Oz).

So what’s the best way to increase movement? Most experts recommend 30-40 minutes of moderate exercise four days per week. But even those of us who are achieving that outside of work might still struggle with back problems if we spend numerous hours plastered to an office chair. To be aware of how long you’ve been sitting at work, set a reminder on your phone, watch, or computer that tells you to get up and move. Take periodic breaks to get water or just get up and walk around.

A great way to increase movement and provide the back with therapeutic exercise is to use a foam roller. Foam rollers provide rejuvenating massage and tension release, helping to hydrate fascia (the body’s connective tissue). These foam roller videos demonstrate how to foam roll to relieve lower back pain.

Can’t foam roll at work? Incorporate some basic stretching into your day as your job allows. Occupational therapist Angela Kneale provides some ideas on how to do this without even leaving your desk in her exercise book, Desk Pilates. Another excellent way to reduce sitting time is to use a raise-lower workstation that allows you to stand while at your computer; many companies are now implementing them.


2.    Improve Posture
Sure, we’ve all heard this one before. But the way we carry ourselves while walking, lifting heavy objects, sitting and sleeping has a direct impact on our spine. And as we know from point #1, many people spend a good portion of the day sitting, so proper posture and alignment is crucial.

The spine’s natural ‘S-shaped’ curve provides the key. Many people tend to slouch forward while at a desk or computer, eliminating their natural curve and proper alignment. It’s so easy to do, it usually happens without realizing it.

Spine Illustration

To counteract slouching, try a posture awareness device that keeps the head from moving too far forward. The OPTP Posture Supporter™ can be worn discreetly underneath clothes to help reduce poor postural habits. It promotes awareness of spinal posture and assists in retraction of the shoulders.

OPTP Posture Supporter
OPTP Posture Supporter™

Another product that helps promote proper sitting position is a lumbar roll. Placed behind your lower back (lumbar region of the spine) on a chair or vehicle seat, it encourages good alignment while providing a comfortable support. One the most popular pain relief products of all time is the Original McKenzie® Lumbar Roll™, a foam cushion that has helped thousands achieve freedom from low back pain. Its simple design is the brainchild of the late Robin McKenzie, a world-renowned therapist who was also responsible for the famous McKenzie Method® of self-treatment.
McKenzie Lumbar Roll
Original McKenzie® Lumbar Roll™

Recent advancements in technology also offer promise for posture improvement. Everything from wearable devices to computer screen sensors have been designed to detect your positioning, providing reminders and feedback for adjustment. Although prices are still fairly high for these new smart gadgets, the market will surely be seeing more of them in the near future.  


3.    Get Stronger
Our muscles can also be a culprit. Because the lower back is not an area of the body that is often worked in most exercise programs, the muscles in this region can become underutilized and weak. It’s important to include forms of exercise that directly address the low back, hips, pelvis, and abdominals, helping to make these core muscles stronger. Stronger back muscles will not only alleviate pain, but also help prevent injury, especially in the case of lifting heavy objects.

Training core muscles can be done in many ways. Simple, classic moves such as sit-ups, squats and planks can be easily performed using just your own body weight. Practices that endorse controlled, focused movement such as Pilates and yoga are also excellent for enhancing core strength. Consider signing up for a class with a local instructor or practicing basic moves at home. Many exercises can be done without the aid of equipment, though these core strength and stability products make excellent props for use during Pilates and general fitness routines. As always, make sure to consult with your physician before starting any exercise program.
io-ball
io-ball

Looking to give your conventional chair an upgrade? All those hours spent sitting at work can be put to better use by simply replacing a regular desk chair with a stability ball. Actively balancing on a stability ball requires the subtle use of core muscles, strengthening them while you’re responding to emails. It’s like a workout while you work!

Ultimately, it’s up to us to take control of our own back pain. It requires effort, but making small lifestyle changes can lead to big benefits down the road. Not everyone will be able to avoid injury, surgical procedures, or hospital stays. But for many of us, a little self-help can go a long way toward achieving an active, pain-free life. As Benjamin Franklin once said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” 

READ MORE Josh Crane, OPTP Staff Writer - May 31, 2017


Showing Posts 1 - 7 of 7
©2021 OPTP. All rights reserved
Overall Rating

Video